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Mercedes-Benz

Import/Export Ready Mercedes Benz GLC300W4

Credit the GLC 300’s new-for-2020 turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine for this feat. Introduced in the 2019 C300, the 255-horsepower engine produces 14 more ponies relative to the previous turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four of last year’s GLC 300. Mercedes claims the GLC 300’s extra horses of the updated GLC 300 help it scoot to 60 miles per hour in 6.1 seconds, or up to 0.3 second quicker than the prior model.

 

With minimal turbo lag and a healthy 273 pound-feet of torque available at 1,800 revs, the forced-induction four ably pushes the GLC 300 off the line and past the slower moving traffic that dots Jersey City. Hammer the right pedal, and the engine eagerly spins to its 6,500 rpm redline, all the while emitting a pleasing – for a four-cylinder – legato grunt.

If only the GLC 300’s nine-speed automatic transmission were as agreeable as its engine. Although it swaps cogs unobtrusively, the gearbox is slow to downshift in the crossover’s default Comfort setting. Toggling to the more aggressive Sport or Sport Plus drive modes improves the transmission’s responses, but both settings also make it prone to holding gears longer than necessary for typical daily driving (there’s also an Eco mode, as well as a configurable Individual mode). At least there are a pair of steering-wheel-mounted shift paddles that afford manual control of the gearbox.

While Mercedes’s 4Matic all-wheel-drive system is available as a $2,000 extra, the GLC 300 I drive does without the feature. Instead, the powertrain sends all of its oomph to the rear wheels. With 88 pounds less weight to carry around on its front end, the rear-drive GLC 300 proves particularly lively on twisting tarmac. Thanks to its light but direct steering, rigid underpinnings, and stiff springs, the 3,889-pound compact crossover is far more entertaining to push around than its mass might suggest. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that this GLC includes $1,250 worth of 20-inch wheels wrapped in summer tires. With gobs of lateral grip from the sticky rubber, limited body roll, and a firm brake pedal, the GLC feels almost as confidence-inspiring on asphalt as its lighter and lower C300 stablemate.

The GLC’s nimble nature comes at the cost of ride quality, though, and the crossover’s multi-link front and rear suspensions’ stiff tuning leaves heads tossing and cargo turning while going over small road irregularities. That said, it’s likely the GLC’s standard 18-inch wheels and all-season tires make for a less rigid ride.

Refreshed exterior cues accompany the GLC 300’s underhood changes, and include a new grille, reworked front and rear fascias, redesigned LED headlights, and updated LED taillights. The optional AMG Line package substitutes the standard Off-Road exterior design’s rather conservative front and rear fascias for more aggressive pieces, as well as additional items such as package-specific 19-inch wheels and cross-drilled front brake discs.

Regardless, the GLC’s new looks add handsome glitz to a generally restrained design. Those searching to turn heads may want to consider the more ostentatious GLC 300 Coupe, which trades the standard model’s tall, wagon-like body for a roofline that plunges aft of the B-pillar. Available exclusively with all-wheel-drive, the Coupe’s $50,000 starting price is $7,500 greater than that of the standard GLC.

 

2020 Mercedes Benz G63 AMG

While this review concentrates on the bonkers Mercedes-AMG G63, managing editor Steven Ewing took a spin in the standard, $124,500 G550 earlier this year. The G550 is better for folks who might actually go off-roading, what with its less-aggressive wheel/tire setup, and it still packs hearty V8 punch and a world-class interior.

The G63, meanwhile, starts at $147,500, and it’s a bombastic, grandiose, completely unnecessary thing. It’s powered by an AMG-built, 4.0-liter, twin-turbocharged V7, pumping out 577 horsepower and 627 pound-feet of torque. That’s a full 161 horsepower and 177 pound-feet more than the G550. And with 22-inch wheels wrapped in summer tires, the G63 is more beast-in-the-street than it is devil-in-the-dirt.

If the old G-Class had one glaring problem, it was the steering. Unchanged for generations, the recirculating-ball setup was kind of scary, with terrible on-center feeling and irregular weighting. For 2019, it’s been replaced by a more traditional, electronically assisted rack-and-pinion system, so the G63 reliably goes in the direction I point it. This more modern steering setup even has two different modes: Comfort feels a bit too light for a vehicle this large, but Sport adds an appropriate amount of weight, and it’s my preferred setting for all situations.

Another big improvement is the independent front suspension. The cold, hard fact is that most G-Wagen owners stay far away from the dirt, and an independent setup provides a much more comfortable ride.

2020 Mercedes Benz GLS450 4MATIC

Mercedes is calling the GLS the S-Class of SUVs. Its engineers wanted to capture the S-Class’ ethos, combining luxury, technology, and design in a quiet, comfortable and refined package. With the GLS’ new all-wheel-drive system and off-road package, it’s all of that in a go-anywhere package.

The Alabama-built GLS debuted just over a decade ago as the GL-Class, sitting atop the ever-growing Mercedes-Benz SUV lineup. Mercedes had already nailed the GLS’ basic formula over two generations, so the automaker focused on refining it further with two new, more powerful, and more efficient engines. A new all-wheel-drive system draws some influence from the tried-and-true G-Wagen. It’s also loaded with the latest driver assistance features and the trick E-Active Body Control air suspension that debuted on last year’s GLE-Class.

The third-gen GLS is slightly larger than before. Its 2.4-inch longer wheelbase has an inch on its nearest competitor, the 2019 BMW X7, and it’s even longer than the long-wheelbase Range Rover. Passengers in the second row are treated to a copious amount of legroom. A new six-seat variant swaps a second-row bench for two captain’s chairs. With the seats slid all the way back, legroom is up 3.4 inches. Third-row space has increased, too, with enough room for a pair of adults to sit comfortably, at least for short distances.

It’s not just about more space, either. The GLS offers five-zone climate control, with the third row getting its own electrically-powered heater and A/C unit. Third-row passengers get optional heated seats in addition to a pair of USB ports (nine in total) and a standard wireless charging pad, meaning everyone in the car should be able to charge their devices at once.

The interior design itself hews closely to the current Mercedes corporate look, in particular, the new GLE class – handsome, clean and typically German, though the ultra-wide instrument cluster/infotainment screen isn’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea. The materials are both pretty to look at and a pleasure to touch, with leather, wood, and metal covering nearly every surface save for the headliner. Even the shifter and turn signal stocks have received some attention, so it doesn’t look like a parts-bin special inside. But more importantly, the highly adjustable seats with optional massage functions keep bodies from becoming too fatigued after hundreds of miles between stops. If you’ve been in any recent Mercedes product, it will all be immediately familiar, but no less impressive for it.

Mercedes new MBUX infotainment system is a huge improvement over the previous system, so we’re glad it’s making its way into more and more models. The interface is cleaner than before, and we like that there are several ways to interact with the system: a new center console touchpad, as well as a voice command. In our experience, the voice commands work better than BMW’s. The augmented reality navigation directions are particularly impressive. It debuted with MBUX in the new 2019 Mercedes-Benz A-Class. It overlays addresses and arrows over what the camera is showing in the center screen. It helps show exactly where you’re at as opposed to a small arrow on a map. That said, the infotainment as a whole isn’t quite as handsome or straightforward as what you find in recent BMW and Audi products. The controls on the steering wheel are small, and the multitude of buttons means you have to take your eyes off the road for simple tasks, like setting the adaptive cruise control or switching menus in the digital instrument cluster.

The GLS has two new (and rather complex) engines, a 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six making 362 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque and a 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 making 483 horsepower and 518 pound-feet of torque. Both are paired with a 48-volt mild-hybrid system Mercedes calls EQ Boost, increasing fuel efficiency and performance. Both systems work the same way. A small electric motor is placed between the engine and transmission and performs a variety of tasks, from smoothing out shifts to mitigating turbo lag by supplying a bit of low-end power while exhaust gasses spool the turbos. It even powers the accessories, meaning these engines are beltless. That makes them more compact, but it also means there’s less parasitic loss from accessories such as the A/C compressor. This is the first time the system is available with a V8 engine, but expect the powertrain to expand to much of Mercedes’ lineup over the next few years.

We’ve sampled the EQ Boost in a variety of models, mostly variants of the E- and CLS-Class, and have been hugely impressed. The system was a finalist for Autoblog‘s Technology of the Year. Like in those other cars, the GLS’ power delivery is smooth and linear, with lots of low-end torque to help you off the line and move through traffic. With the kick of torque and lack of turbo lag, these don’t feel like other small-displacement turbo engines, including those from Mercedes. There’s power all over the rev band, and while fuel economy ratings haven’t been revealed, expect a significant improvement over last year’s model. While the new V8 in the GLS 580 is knockout, with effortless power and a throaty exhaust note at full bore, the 3.0-liter in the GLS 450 offers plenty of power day-to-day and is a good value on its own.

All GLS models send power to all four wheels through a nine-speed automatic transmission. It’s smooth and unobtrusive like any good automatic should be, and it’s right there with ZF’s seemingly ubiquitous 8HP 8-speed automatic in terms of refinement.

The new four-wheel-drive system is far more noteworthy. The old GLS’ system had a fixed 50:50 front-to-rear torque split, but the new model is fully variable, sending 100-percent of the power to the rear wheels in most situations and up to 50-percent of the power to the front when needed. It should help improve traction in all situations, but on loose surfaces like sand, gravel or dirt, it’s pretty damn easy to induce oversteer to help the rear of the 17-foot-long SUV rotate like a vehicle half its size. It’s amazing just how nimble the GLS feels, especially off road or on tight switchbacks. The turning radius is extremely tight, making it feel and drive like a much shorter and narrower vehicle.

While no GLS owner is actually going to be doing any serious off-roading, the GLS is plenty capable, especially with the new off-road package. The package includes a real, legitimate low range for better crawling and an enhanced Off-Road+ mode that adjusts things like throttle response, suspension and transmission tuning. The GLS also includes hill-descent control and adjustable ride height. All told, the GLS is similar to the Range Rover in that it’s far more capable than it really needs to be.

The new engines and four-wheel-drive system are great, but the single most impressive thing about the 2020 GLS is the ride. The standard air suspension offers a smooth and isolating ride for such a big SUV, but the optional E-Active Body Control is something really special. It’s a complicated system (if you haven’t gathered it by now, most of what makes the GLS good is complicated), but the basic premise is that a camera reads the road ahead and pre-loads the suspension for any imperfections. Unlike some reactive systems, this knows what’s coming up ahead, smoothing out imperfections and potholes like they aren’t even there. We expected it to work well on the pavement, but the way it seemingly flattens out a dirt road is truly transformative. While it’s mainly responsible for improving ride, E-Active Body Control can help you get unstuck in mud or sand. It looks a bit goofy bouncing up and down like an Impala in a ’90s music video, but it works.

2020 Mercedes Benz GLS450 4MATIC

Mercedes is calling the GLS the S-Class of SUVs. Its engineers wanted to capture the S-Class’ ethos, combining luxury, technology, and design in a quiet, comfortable and refined package. With the GLS’ new all-wheel-drive system and off-road package, it’s all of that in a go-anywhere package.

The Alabama-built GLS debuted just over a decade ago as the GL-Class, sitting atop the ever-growing Mercedes-Benz SUV lineup. Mercedes had already nailed the GLS’ basic formula over two generations, so the automaker focused on refining it further with two new, more powerful, and more efficient engines. A new all-wheel-drive system draws some influence from the tried-and-true G-Wagen. It’s also loaded with the latest driver assistance features and the trick E-Active Body Control air suspension that debuted on last year’s GLE-Class.

The third-gen GLS is slightly larger than before. Its 2.4-inch longer wheelbase has an inch on its nearest competitor, the 2019 BMW X7, and it’s even longer than the long-wheelbase Range Rover. Passengers in the second row are treated to a copious amount of legroom. A new six-seat variant swaps a second-row bench for two captain’s chairs. With the seats slid all the way back, legroom is up 3.4 inches. Third-row space has increased, too, with enough room for a pair of adults to sit comfortably, at least for short distances.

It’s not just about more space, either. The GLS offers five-zone climate control, with the third row getting its own electrically-powered heater and A/C unit. Third-row passengers get optional heated seats in addition to a pair of USB ports (nine in total) and a standard wireless charging pad, meaning everyone in the car should be able to charge their devices at once.

The interior design itself hews closely to the current Mercedes corporate look, in particular, the new GLE class – handsome, clean and typically German, though the ultra-wide instrument cluster/infotainment screen isn’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea. The materials are both pretty to look at and a pleasure to touch, with leather, wood, and metal covering nearly every surface save for the headliner. Even the shifter and turn signal stocks have received some attention, so it doesn’t look like a parts-bin special inside. But more importantly, the highly adjustable seats with optional massage functions keep bodies from becoming too fatigued after hundreds of miles between stops. If you’ve been in any recent Mercedes product, it will all be immediately familiar, but no less impressive for it.

Mercedes new MBUX infotainment system is a huge improvement over the previous system, so we’re glad it’s making its way into more and more models. The interface is cleaner than before, and we like that there are several ways to interact with the system: a new center console touchpad, as well as a voice command. In our experience, the voice commands work better than BMW’s. The augmented reality navigation directions are particularly impressive. It debuted with MBUX in the new 2019 Mercedes-Benz A-Class. It overlays addresses and arrows over what the camera is showing in the center screen. It helps show exactly where you’re at as opposed to a small arrow on a map. That said, the infotainment as a whole isn’t quite as handsome or straightforward as what you find in recent BMW and Audi products. The controls on the steering wheel are small, and the multitude of buttons means you have to take your eyes off the road for simple tasks, like setting the adaptive cruise control or switching menus in the digital instrument cluster.

The GLS has two new (and rather complex) engines, a 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six making 362 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque and a 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 making 483 horsepower and 518 pound-feet of torque. Both are paired with a 48-volt mild-hybrid system Mercedes calls EQ Boost, increasing fuel efficiency and performance. Both systems work the same way. A small electric motor is placed between the engine and transmission and performs a variety of tasks, from smoothing out shifts to mitigating turbo lag by supplying a bit of low-end power while exhaust gasses spool the turbos. It even powers the accessories, meaning these engines are beltless. That makes them more compact, but it also means there’s less parasitic loss from accessories such as the A/C compressor. This is the first time the system is available with a V8 engine, but expect the powertrain to expand to much of Mercedes’ lineup over the next few years.

We’ve sampled the EQ Boost in a variety of models, mostly variants of the E- and CLS-Class, and have been hugely impressed. The system was a finalist for Autoblog‘s Technology of the Year. Like in those other cars, the GLS’ power delivery is smooth and linear, with lots of low-end torque to help you off the line and move through traffic. With the kick of torque and lack of turbo lag, these don’t feel like other small-displacement turbo engines, including those from Mercedes. There’s power all over the rev band, and while fuel economy ratings haven’t been revealed, expect a significant improvement over last year’s model. While the new V8 in the GLS 580 is knockout, with effortless power and a throaty exhaust note at full bore, the 3.0-liter in the GLS 450 offers plenty of power day-to-day and is a good value on its own.

All GLS models send power to all four wheels through a nine-speed automatic transmission. It’s smooth and unobtrusive like any good automatic should be, and it’s right there with ZF’s seemingly ubiquitous 8HP 8-speed automatic in terms of refinement.

The new four-wheel-drive system is far more noteworthy. The old GLS’ system had a fixed 50:50 front-to-rear torque split, but the new model is fully variable, sending 100-percent of the power to the rear wheels in most situations and up to 50-percent of the power to the front when needed. It should help improve traction in all situations, but on loose surfaces like sand, gravel or dirt, it’s pretty damn easy to induce oversteer to help the rear of the 17-foot-long SUV rotate like a vehicle half its size. It’s amazing just how nimble the GLS feels, especially off road or on tight switchbacks. The turning radius is extremely tight, making it feel and drive like a much shorter and narrower vehicle.

While no GLS owner is actually going to be doing any serious off-roading, the GLS is plenty capable, especially with the new off-road package. The package includes a real, legitimate low range for better crawling and an enhanced Off-Road+ mode that adjusts things like throttle response, suspension and transmission tuning. The GLS also includes hill-descent control and adjustable ride height. All told, the GLS is similar to the Range Rover in that it’s far more capable than it really needs to be.

The new engines and four-wheel-drive system are great, but the single most impressive thing about the 2020 GLS is the ride. The standard air suspension offers a smooth and isolating ride for such a big SUV, but the optional E-Active Body Control is something really special. It’s a complicated system (if you haven’t gathered it by now, most of what makes the GLS good is complicated), but the basic premise is that a camera reads the road ahead and pre-loads the suspension for any imperfections. Unlike some reactive systems, this knows what’s coming up ahead, smoothing out imperfections and potholes like they aren’t even there. We expected it to work well on the pavement, but the way it seemingly flattens out a dirt road is truly transformative. While it’s mainly responsible for improving ride, E-Active Body Control can help you get unstuck in mud or sand. It looks a bit goofy bouncing up and down like an Impala in a ’90s music video, but it works.

2020 Mercedes Benz GLS450 4MATIC

Mercedes is calling the GLS the S-Class of SUVs. Its engineers wanted to capture the S-Class’ ethos, combining luxury, technology, and design in a quiet, comfortable and refined package. With the GLS’ new all-wheel-drive system and off-road package, it’s all of that in a go-anywhere package.

The Alabama-built GLS debuted just over a decade ago as the GL-Class, sitting atop the ever-growing Mercedes-Benz SUV lineup. Mercedes had already nailed the GLS’ basic formula over two generations, so the automaker focused on refining it further with two new, more powerful, and more efficient engines. A new all-wheel-drive system draws some influence from the tried-and-true G-Wagen. It’s also loaded with the latest driver assistance features and the trick E-Active Body Control air suspension that debuted on last year’s GLE-Class.

The third-gen GLS is slightly larger than before. Its 2.4-inch longer wheelbase has an inch on its nearest competitor, the 2019 BMW X7, and it’s even longer than the long-wheelbase Range Rover. Passengers in the second row are treated to a copious amount of legroom. A new six-seat variant swaps a second-row bench for two captain’s chairs. With the seats slid all the way back, legroom is up 3.4 inches. Third-row space has increased, too, with enough room for a pair of adults to sit comfortably, at least for short distances.

It’s not just about more space, either. The GLS offers five-zone climate control, with the third row getting its own electrically-powered heater and A/C unit. Third-row passengers get optional heated seats in addition to a pair of USB ports (nine in total) and a standard wireless charging pad, meaning everyone in the car should be able to charge their devices at once.

The interior design itself hews closely to the current Mercedes corporate look, in particular, the new GLE class – handsome, clean and typically German, though the ultra-wide instrument cluster/infotainment screen isn’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea. The materials are both pretty to look at and a pleasure to touch, with leather, wood, and metal covering nearly every surface save for the headliner. Even the shifter and turn signal stocks have received some attention, so it doesn’t look like a parts-bin special inside. But more importantly, the highly adjustable seats with optional massage functions keep bodies from becoming too fatigued after hundreds of miles between stops. If you’ve been in any recent Mercedes product, it will all be immediately familiar, but no less impressive for it.

Mercedes new MBUX infotainment system is a huge improvement over the previous system, so we’re glad it’s making its way into more and more models. The interface is cleaner than before, and we like that there are several ways to interact with the system: a new center console touchpad, as well as a voice command. In our experience, the voice commands work better than BMW’s. The augmented reality navigation directions are particularly impressive. It debuted with MBUX in the new 2019 Mercedes-Benz A-Class. It overlays addresses and arrows over what the camera is showing in the center screen. It helps show exactly where you’re at as opposed to a small arrow on a map. That said, the infotainment as a whole isn’t quite as handsome or straightforward as what you find in recent BMW and Audi products. The controls on the steering wheel are small, and the multitude of buttons means you have to take your eyes off the road for simple tasks, like setting the adaptive cruise control or switching menus in the digital instrument cluster.

The GLS has two new (and rather complex) engines, a 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six making 362 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque and a 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 making 483 horsepower and 518 pound-feet of torque. Both are paired with a 48-volt mild-hybrid system Mercedes calls EQ Boost, increasing fuel efficiency and performance. Both systems work the same way. A small electric motor is placed between the engine and transmission and performs a variety of tasks, from smoothing out shifts to mitigating turbo lag by supplying a bit of low-end power while exhaust gasses spool the turbos. It even powers the accessories, meaning these engines are beltless. That makes them more compact, but it also means there’s less parasitic loss from accessories such as the A/C compressor. This is the first time the system is available with a V8 engine, but expect the powertrain to expand to much of Mercedes’ lineup over the next few years.

We’ve sampled the EQ Boost in a variety of models, mostly variants of the E- and CLS-Class, and have been hugely impressed. The system was a finalist for Autoblog‘s Technology of the Year. Like in those other cars, the GLS’ power delivery is smooth and linear, with lots of low-end torque to help you off the line and move through traffic. With the kick of torque and lack of turbo lag, these don’t feel like other small-displacement turbo engines, including those from Mercedes. There’s power all over the rev band, and while fuel economy ratings haven’t been revealed, expect a significant improvement over last year’s model. While the new V8 in the GLS 580 is knockout, with effortless power and a throaty exhaust note at full bore, the 3.0-liter in the GLS 450 offers plenty of power day-to-day and is a good value on its own.

All GLS models send power to all four wheels through a nine-speed automatic transmission. It’s smooth and unobtrusive like any good automatic should be, and it’s right there with ZF’s seemingly ubiquitous 8HP 8-speed automatic in terms of refinement.

The new four-wheel-drive system is far more noteworthy. The old GLS’ system had a fixed 50:50 front-to-rear torque split, but the new model is fully variable, sending 100-percent of the power to the rear wheels in most situations and up to 50-percent of the power to the front when needed. It should help improve traction in all situations, but on loose surfaces like sand, gravel or dirt, it’s pretty damn easy to induce oversteer to help the rear of the 17-foot-long SUV rotate like a vehicle half its size. It’s amazing just how nimble the GLS feels, especially off road or on tight switchbacks. The turning radius is extremely tight, making it feel and drive like a much shorter and narrower vehicle.

While no GLS owner is actually going to be doing any serious off-roading, the GLS is plenty capable, especially with the new off-road package. The package includes a real, legitimate low range for better crawling and an enhanced Off-Road+ mode that adjusts things like throttle response, suspension and transmission tuning. The GLS also includes hill-descent control and adjustable ride height. All told, the GLS is similar to the Range Rover in that it’s far more capable than it really needs to be.

The new engines and four-wheel-drive system are great, but the single most impressive thing about the 2020 GLS is the ride. The standard air suspension offers a smooth and isolating ride for such a big SUV, but the optional E-Active Body Control is something really special. It’s a complicated system (if you haven’t gathered it by now, most of what makes the GLS good is complicated), but the basic premise is that a camera reads the road ahead and pre-loads the suspension for any imperfections. Unlike some reactive systems, this knows what’s coming up ahead, smoothing out imperfections and potholes like they aren’t even there. We expected it to work well on the pavement, but the way it seemingly flattens out a dirt road is truly transformative. While it’s mainly responsible for improving ride, E-Active Body Control can help you get unstuck in mud or sand. It looks a bit goofy bouncing up and down like an Impala in a ’90s music video, but it works.

2020 Mercedes Benz GLE350 4MATIC

The Mercedes-Benz GLE has been one of the top-rated luxury SUVs on Edmunds. This year, it’s been given a full redesign, adding more features, more refinement, and greater capabilities. It should come as no surprise that the new 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE sets a new standard.

In addition to all of the touches that make a Mercedes special, the GLE gets all of the latest and greatest innovations and upgrades. The MBUX infotainment system is standard on all models and has garnered high praise for its ease of use and cutting-edge tech. There are also plenty of available advanced safety features and driver assistance for added security. For 2020, you can add a third row of seats, and even better, all of these items are available on every GLE model.

The only feature that is unique to the top-tier GLE 450 4Matic is the innovative new E-Active Body Control suspension option. If you happen to have a generous budget, it’s a game-changer. This suspension leans the vehicle into turns, much like how a motorcycle does. For passengers, it reduces the sensation of lateral cornering forces, making it feel incredibly sure-footed.

But even if you just get the base GLE 350, this Mercedes SUV will easily satisfy with its modern design, impeccable interior, and solid construction. If you’re in the market for a midsize luxury SUV, the 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE should be at the top of your list.

Get acquainted with the newly reimagined 2020 GLE. Looking toward the future of progress, this SUV sets innovation into motion. Equipped with the all-new Mercedes-Benz User Experience system (MBUX), your desires are met through artificial intelligence as it learns your preferences along the way. Augmented reality displays enhanced navigation, illuminating your path with groundbreaking features. And the simple utterance of “Hey Mercedes” activates Intelligent Voice Control, commanding this vehicle to attention.

Defined by its modern take on luxury, the GLE craves off-roading to exhibit its raw ability to traverse rugged terrain, as it generously dispenses power and confident stability. Ever the superior athlete, all variants transmit an exemplary performance with a 9G-TRONIC 9-speed automatic transmission — making exhilaration standard. Pioneering an all-new intelligent chassis — the only system of its kind on the market — this SUV uses 48-volt technology to increase efficiency and comfort wherever you roam.

Take the wheel for a range of extensive Driver Assistance features that refine every journey to deliver cool composure. The fastidious design brings flowing surfaces and stellar ergonomics for extraordinary comfort, while the increased wheelbase creates significantly more interior space.

The 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE will debut this October 2018 at the World Premiere at Mondial l’ Automobile in Paris and will cruise into U.S. dealerships spring 2019.

2020 Mercedes Benz GLE450 4MATIC

Within the recent updates to Mercedes-Benz’s core lineup, the freshening of the 2020 GLE-class is a big deal. Introduced as the M-class in 1998 and renamed GLE in 2015, the mid-size SUV has long been a key part of the Mercedes range. Although it hasn’t reached the iconic status of the also new G-class, the significance of the GLE’s updates are undeniable and mostly satisfying.

The 2020 GLE comes standard with a 255-hp turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four denoted by a GLE350 badge on its liftgate. But the turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six in our GLE450 test car is a juicier cut. The silky-smooth engine and its 48-volt hybrid electrical system are shared with the Mercedes-Benz CLS450 and will soon spread to other Benz models. Here it develops 362 horsepower, routed through a nine-speed automatic transmission and standard all-wheel drive.

The turbo six’s power was more than adequate for our test vehicle’s hefty 5151 pounds, and highway merging and passing maneuvers were never anxiety-inducing. Mat the accelerator and the GLE450 moves off with little hesitation and an authoritative soundtrack, particularly in the Sport and Sport Plus driving modes (along with the default Comfort setting, there are also Eco and Individual modes). We recorded acceleration times that were slightly quicker than those of the outgoing six-cylinder GLE400, but the improvement is incremental. The GLE450 managed a 5.3-second zero-to-60-mph run, which puts it on pace with the Audi Q8 but 0.4 seconds behind the six-cylinder BMW X5. The Benz nearly catches up with the quicker Bimmer in the quarter-mile, however, posting a 13.9-second pass at 100 mph.

On the road, the GLE450 rides less stiffly than the Audi or the BMW, yet with less agility and composure. Our test car came with one of the two different optional air-suspension systems, but it lacked the astute body control over road undulations and in brisk cornering maneuvers that we expected, even considering it’s an off-road-capable SUV. The standard suspension features conventional steel coil springs, but we have yet to experience that setup. The feeling of excessive suspension compliance was borne out on the skidpad, where the GLE450 delivered a so-so 0.82 g of grip versus the BMW’s 0.89 g.

Despite the suspension’s extra pliancy, the GLE’s ride over pockmarked roads was often harsh on our test car’s optional 20-inch wheels; we have yet to drive a version of the standard 19-inches. Stomping on the Benz’s reassuringly firm brake pedal results in a class-competitive 175-foot stop from 70 mph, although the aggressive initial bite from the calipers can be difficult to modulate in stop-and-go traffic.

The new GLE-class’s cabin pushes Benz’s interior design further along while still holding true to the rest of the lineup. Our GLE450 4Matic test vehicle was loaded with options—$18,810 worth, to be exact—and included an in-cabin fragrance diffuser, four-zone automatic climate control, heated front and rear seats, soft-close doors, a huge head-up display, and a 64-color ambient lighting system that flashes the integrated lighting strips either blue or red when adjusting the temperature of the climate control. Our example came equipped with the $1850 Premium package, which adds the ambient lighting system, an inductive charging pad for devices, satellite radio, a 115-volt power outlet, and a 13-speaker Burmester audio system. The upgraded stereo provides rich, crisp sound, but its lower front speakers sent unseemly vibrations into the drivers-side footwell, even after we adjusted the bass and switched to our local NPR station for the latest episode of This American Life. The faux leather and microsuede seat upholstery in our test vehicle looked attractive, but at an $80,955 as-tested price, we’d have appreciated genuine materials.

Passenger space is plentiful in both the front and back seats; Mercedes is now offering an optional third row of seats in the GLE-class, but our test vehicle wasn’t fitted with the pop-up chairs. Two widescreen 12.3-inch displays float in front of the dashboard as they do in other contemporary Benzes and project Mercedes-Benz’s new MBUX infotainment system that debuted in the entry-level A-class last year. The new interface isn’t as logically laid out as the previous generation’s COMAND infotainment system and requires some initial familiarization. But MBUX can be controlled via touchscreen, voice, or a console-mounted touchpad, the latter of which is far superior to the nominally similar setup in some Lexus models. The system’s voice commands are handy in their responsiveness to simple commands, and it responds much like Apple’s Siri or Amazon’s Alexa, but we can’t help feeling a little silly when summoning the system’s attention with the “Hey, Mercedes” command prompt.

2020 Mercedes Benz GLE450 4MATIC

Within the recent updates to Mercedes-Benz’s core lineup, the freshening of the 2020 GLE-class is a big deal. Introduced as the M-class in 1998 and renamed GLE in 2015, the mid-size SUV has long been a key part of the Mercedes range. Although it hasn’t reached the iconic status of the also new G-class, the significance of the GLE’s updates are undeniable and mostly satisfying.

The 2020 GLE comes standard with a 255-hp turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four denoted by a GLE350 badge on its liftgate. But the turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six in our GLE450 test car is a juicier cut. The silky-smooth engine and its 48-volt hybrid electrical system are shared with the Mercedes-Benz CLS450 and will soon spread to other Benz models. Here it develops 362 horsepower, routed through a nine-speed automatic transmission and standard all-wheel drive.

The turbo six’s power was more than adequate for our test vehicle’s hefty 5151 pounds, and highway merging and passing maneuvers were never anxiety-inducing. Mat the accelerator and the GLE450 moves off with little hesitation and an authoritative soundtrack, particularly in the Sport and Sport Plus driving modes (along with the default Comfort setting, there are also Eco and Individual modes). We recorded acceleration times that were slightly quicker than those of the outgoing six-cylinder GLE400, but the improvement is incremental. The GLE450 managed a 5.3-second zero-to-60-mph run, which puts it on pace with the Audi Q8 but 0.4 seconds behind the six-cylinder BMW X5. The Benz nearly catches up with the quicker Bimmer in the quarter-mile, however, posting a 13.9-second pass at 100 mph.

On the road, the GLE450 rides less stiffly than the Audi or the BMW, yet with less agility and composure. Our test car came with one of the two different optional air-suspension systems, but it lacked the astute body control over road undulations and in brisk cornering maneuvers that we expected, even considering it’s an off-road-capable SUV. The standard suspension features conventional steel coil springs, but we have yet to experience that setup. The feeling of excessive suspension compliance was borne out on the skidpad, where the GLE450 delivered a so-so 0.82 g of grip versus the BMW’s 0.89 g.

Despite the suspension’s extra pliancy, the GLE’s ride over pockmarked roads was often harsh on our test car’s optional 20-inch wheels; we have yet to drive a version of the standard 19-inches. Stomping on the Benz’s reassuringly firm brake pedal results in a class-competitive 175-foot stop from 70 mph, although the aggressive initial bite from the calipers can be difficult to modulate in stop-and-go traffic.

The new GLE-class’s cabin pushes Benz’s interior design further along while still holding true to the rest of the lineup. Our GLE450 4Matic test vehicle was loaded with options—$18,810 worth, to be exact—and included an in-cabin fragrance diffuser, four-zone automatic climate control, heated front and rear seats, soft-close doors, a huge head-up display, and a 64-color ambient lighting system that flashes the integrated lighting strips either blue or red when adjusting the temperature of the climate control. Our example came equipped with the $1850 Premium package, which adds the ambient lighting system, an inductive charging pad for devices, satellite radio, a 115-volt power outlet, and a 13-speaker Burmester audio system. The upgraded stereo provides rich, crisp sound, but its lower front speakers sent unseemly vibrations into the drivers-side footwell, even after we adjusted the bass and switched to our local NPR station for the latest episode of This American Life. The faux leather and microsuede seat upholstery in our test vehicle looked attractive, but at an $80,955 as-tested price, we’d have appreciated genuine materials.

Passenger space is plentiful in both the front and back seats; Mercedes is now offering an optional third row of seats in the GLE-class, but our test vehicle wasn’t fitted with the pop-up chairs. Two widescreen 12.3-inch displays float in front of the dashboard as they do in other contemporary Benzes and project Mercedes-Benz’s new MBUX infotainment system that debuted in the entry-level A-class last year. The new interface isn’t as logically laid out as the previous generation’s COMAND infotainment system and requires some initial familiarization. But MBUX can be controlled via touchscreen, voice, or a console-mounted touchpad, the latter of which is far superior to the nominally similar setup in some Lexus models. The system’s voice commands are handy in their responsiveness to simple commands, and it responds much like Apple’s Siri or Amazon’s Alexa, but we can’t help feeling a little silly when summoning the system’s attention with the “Hey, Mercedes” command prompt.

Related

2020 Mercedes Benz GLE450 4MATIC

The Mercedes-Benz GLE has been one of the top-rated luxury SUVs on Edmunds. This year, it’s been given a full redesign, adding more features, more refinement, and greater capabilities. It should come as no surprise that the new 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE sets a new standard.

In addition to all of the touches that make a Mercedes special, the GLE gets all of the latest and greatest innovations and upgrades. The MBUX infotainment system is standard on all models and has garnered high praise for its ease of use and cutting-edge tech. There are also plenty of available advanced safety features and driver assistance for added security. For 2020, you can add a third row of seats, and even better, all of these items are available on every GLE model.

The only feature that is unique to the top-tier GLE 450 4Matic is the innovative new E-Active Body Control suspension option. If you happen to have a generous budget, it’s a game-changer. This suspension leans the vehicle into turns, much like how a motorcycle does. For passengers, it reduces the sensation of lateral cornering forces, making it feel incredibly sure-footed.

But even if you just get the base GLE 350, this Mercedes SUV will easily satisfy with its modern design, impeccable interior and solid construction. If you’re in the market for a midsize luxury SUV, the 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE should be at the top of your list.

Get acquainted with the newly reimagined 2020 GLE. Looking toward the future of progress, this SUV sets innovation into motion. Equipped with the all-new Mercedes-Benz User Experience system (MBUX), your desires are met through artificial intelligence as it learns your preferences along the way. Augmented reality displays enhanced navigation, illuminating your path with groundbreaking features. And the simple utterance of “Hey Mercedes” activates Intelligent Voice Control, commanding this vehicle to attention.

Defined by its modern take on luxury, the GLE craves off-roading to exhibit its raw ability to traverse rugged terrain, as it generously dispenses power and confident stability. Ever the superior athlete, all variants transmit an exemplary performance with a 9G-TRONIC 9-speed automatic transmission — making exhilaration standard. Pioneering an all-new intelligent chassis — the only system of its kind on the market — this SUV uses 48-volt technology to increase efficiency and comfort wherever you roam.

Take the wheel for a range of extensive Driver Assistance features that refine every journey to deliver cool composure. The fastidious design brings flowing surfaces and stellar ergonomics for extraordinary comfort, while the increased wheelbase creates significantly more interior space.

The 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE will debut this October 2018 at the World Premiere at Mondial l’ Automobile in Paris and will cruise into U.S. dealerships spring 2019.

2020 Mercedes Benz GLE350 4MATIC

The Mercedes-Benz GLE has been one of the top-rated luxury SUVs on Edmunds. This year, it’s been given a full redesign, adding more features, more refinement, and greater capabilities. It should come as no surprise that the new 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE sets a new standard.

In addition to all of the touches that make a Mercedes special, the GLE gets all of the latest and greatest innovations and upgrades. The MBUX infotainment system is standard on all models and has garnered high praise for its ease of use and cutting-edge tech. There are also plenty of available advanced safety features and driver assistance for added security. For 2020, you can add a third row of seats, and even better, all of these items are available on every GLE model.

The only feature that is unique to the top-tier GLE 450 4Matic is the innovative new E-Active Body Control suspension option. If you happen to have a generous budget, it’s a game-changer. This suspension leans the vehicle into turns, much like how a motorcycle does. For passengers, it reduces the sensation of lateral cornering forces, making it feel incredibly sure-footed.

But even if you just get the base GLE 350, this Mercedes SUV will easily satisfy with its modern design, impeccable interior, and solid construction. If you’re in the market for a midsize luxury SUV, the 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE should be at the top of your list.

Get acquainted with the newly reimagined 2020 GLE. Looking toward the future of progress, this SUV sets innovation into motion. Equipped with the all-new Mercedes-Benz User Experience system (MBUX), your desires are met through artificial intelligence as it learns your preferences along the way. Augmented reality displays enhanced navigation, illuminating your path with groundbreaking features. And the simple utterance of “Hey Mercedes” activates Intelligent Voice Control, commanding this vehicle to attention.

Defined by its modern take on luxury, the GLE craves off-roading to exhibit its raw ability to traverse rugged terrain, as it generously dispenses power and confident stability. Ever the superior athlete, all variants transmit an exemplary performance with a 9G-TRONIC 9-speed automatic transmission — making exhilaration standard. Pioneering an all-new intelligent chassis — the only system of its kind on the market — this SUV uses 48-volt technology to increase efficiency and comfort wherever you roam.

Take the wheel for a range of extensive Driver Assistance features that refine every journey to deliver cool composure. The fastidious design brings flowing surfaces and stellar ergonomics for extraordinary comfort, while the increased wheelbase creates significantly more interior space.

The 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE will debut this October 2018 at the World Premiere at Mondial l’ Automobile in Paris and will cruise into U.S. dealerships spring 2019.

Import/Export 2020 Mercedes Benz GLS450 4MATIC

The 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class debuted its big third-generation shape in April, revealing a refreshed design with tons of tech and new powertrain choices, including a new turbocharged inline-six and a meaty twin-turbo V8. One thing that Mercedes didn’t mention at the big reveal for its range-topping SUV is price, but that’s been at least partially remedied today with a dollar figure for the entry-level GLS 450. As you’d expect it’s not exactly cheap with a starting price of $75,200, and that doesn’t include $995 in destination charges.

Of course, there’s the fresh engine under the hood as well. The new 3.0-liter inline-six makes 362 horsepower (269 kilowatts) and 369 pound-feet (500 Newton-meters) of torque, which discriminating Mercedes-Benz followers will note is exactly the same on both counts as the previous-generation twin-turbo V6. However, the new arrangement features the automaker’s EQ Boost mild-hybrid tech that aids in both efficiency and power delivery. Using the same nine-speed automatic turning all four wheels as the previous model, Mercedes says the new GLS 450 can reach 60 mph in 5.9 seconds – roughly a half-second quicker than its predecessor.

Like the outgoing model, the 2020 GLS-class will come standard with both all-wheel drive and an air-suspension system, but the new model can also be equipped with Mercedes’s E-Active Body Control suspension system. The active suspension is novel, utilizing the car’s hybrid system to quickly change its damping based on what a forward-facing camera sees on the road ahead, allowing it to deliver a smoother ride on potholed roads and adapt to changing off-road conditions. It can also hilariously bounce itself up and down to help the driver get unstuck from sand or mud. E-Active Body Control adds $8200 to the price of the also-new 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE-class, and we expect it to carry a similar premium here.

While the new GLS450 is a good bit more expensive than the old model, it’s close in price to its main competitor, BMW’s new X7 SUV. In six-cylinder form, the BMW is only $1300 cheaper than the Mercedes and is equally easy to load up with options. The new GLS will hit dealerships at the end of this year, with pricing for the GLS580 model to be revealed then.

Import/Export 2019 Mercedes Benz Maybach S 560 4MATIC

The Maybach S-class cars are best enjoyed from the rear seat, where passengers can stretch out and relax on hot-stone-style massaging leather recliners and enjoy the Burmester audio system while an atomizer fills the cabin with one of Maybach’s five signature fragrances. The Maybach models ride on a wheelbase that’s 7.9 inches longer than the Benz-branded S-class cars and nearly all of that extra length is dedicated to the rear seat to create an extra-spacious environment. That’s not to say that the front seat isn’t luxurious. The driver and front-seat passenger are treated to most of the same luxuries—including the massaging seats—and the dashboard’s dual 12.3-inch digital displays provide access to the car’s infotainment system. A host of driver-assistance features are available including an adaptive-cruise-control system that uses navigational data to slow the car down in preparation for corners and an automatic lane-change feature that watches for gaps in traffic and merges the S-class when it’s safe to do so.

The S560’s 463-hp twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8 and the S650’s 621-hp twin-turbo 6.0-liter V-12 both provide effortless motivation. In our testing, the S560 managed a smooth and fleet-footed trip to 60 mph in just 4.7 seconds. The S650 might not be much quicker (we haven’t tested one) but in our experience, its V-12 has proven to be even silkier in its operation than the V-8 in other Mercedes vehicles. All Maybach models come with a nine-speed automatic; all-wheel drive is standard on the S560 but the S650 is only available with rear-wheel drive. Like its lesser S-class brethren, the Maybach has undergone an extensive refresh for 2018. All S-class sedans receive new fascias along with LED headlights and taillamps that better align the car’s looks with those of newer Mercedes products. On the Maybach, fresh details include a small Maybach badge housed within the redesigned grille and a Maybach-specific front bumper that includes chrome-outlined lower air intakes.

The extra length directly benefits rear-seat passengers, as legroom increases from 34.1 inches in the Benz to an even 40.0 inches in the Maybach. The sumptuous rear compartment includes four-way power-adjustable outboard seats with heating and cooling functions, power-operated leg rests, and a built-in massage feature. Those in search of additional splendor can drop $1950 to have the rear bench replaced with a pair of individual seats and a full-length center console with folding tray tables. A refrigerated box in the rear adds another $1100 to the bill, while hand-crafted silver champagne flutes will set customers back $3200. Entertainment screens attached to the front seatbacks are standard and offer rear passengers their own set of infotainment controls as well as individual sets of wireless headphones.

Although the Maybach’s accommodating rear quarters are its proverbial heart and soul, the car is no less enjoyable from the comfort of its 12-way power-adjustable front seats, both of which can heat, cool, and massage those settled in their cozy confines.

As in all S-class models, the Maybach’s dashboard is marked by a pair of 12.3-inch screens. The one mounted directly in front of the driver serves as the instrument cluster but also is able to display other pertinent vehicle information such as the feed from the standard front-mounted infrared night-vision camera. The second screen sits in the center of the dash and covers all infotainment functions. Unlike last year’s model, both screens now rest under a single piece of glass for a sleeker look.

A center-console-mounted rotary knob with a touchpad above it remains the primary means for users to interact with the central screen. Alternately, the driver can interface with both screens by way of touch-sensitive pads located on the reshaped three-spoke steering wheel. The right pad works the center screen, while the left one manages the instrument cluster. The infotainment system also accepts voice commands. Although the Maybach’s familiar styling may not garner the same attention as its British competition, the massive Mercedes provides a similarly cosseting cabin as those found in the pricier Bentley and Rolls-Royce. Be sure to find a good chauffeur, though, because if you’re not going to ride in the Maybach’s opulent rear seat, you may want to stick with the smaller and less-expensive Mercedes-Benz S560 4Matic.

2019 Mercedes Benz S 450 4MATIC

The S-class has long been synonymous with luxury, thanks to the car’s elegant aesthetics and compelling performance. Whether you choose the roomy sedan, sporty coupe, or indulgent convertible, these high-class Benzes are loaded with the latest technology and the richest materials. Anybody who’s somebody is a regular passenger in this world-class sedan, and it’s an easy choice for buyers who won’t settle for anything but the best. Yes, it’s expensive, but as the saying goes, you get what you pay for, and that has never been truer than when said about the S-class.

While the S450’s twin-turbo V-6 is probably plenty of engine for most drivers, it’s hard to resist the S560’s silken V-8, so it’s the model we’d select. No matter which version you choose, the S-class is pricey, so we’d be light with the options. We would, however, consider the Driver Assistance package that adds a semi-autonomous driving mode, among other driver-assist features. We’d also select the Premium package, which adds massaging front seats with heat and ventilation; a self-parking feature with a 360-degree exterior camera system; power side-window sunshades for the rear seat; and keyless entry with push-button start.

The S-class sedan is available with one of two buttery smooth and powerful gasoline powertrains: a 362-hp twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6 and a 463-hp twin-turbocharged 4.0-liter V-8. The former is sold with S450 badges, and the latter wears S560 on its trunk lid. Rear-wheel drive is standard, but all-wheel drive can be ordered with either engine. We clocked a rear-wheel-drive S450 at 5.3 seconds in our zero-to-60-mph test; the S560 did the deed in 4.2 seconds. Two-door models come only with the V-8 and the coupe managed a brisk 4.0-second zero-to-60-mph run at our test track. If these numbers aren’t exciting enough for you, the Mercedes-AMG lineup of S-classes (reviewed separately) is even quicker.

Behind its impressive visage—and huge screen area from its dual 12.3-inch displays—the S-class’s COMAND system is complex and holds the potential to overwhelm users. The menu structures are straightforward enough, but they juggle a great number of functions and options. There are five choices of controls for navigating the system, including the main control knob, a touch-sensitive pad next to that knob, hard-button shortcuts to key menus on the dashboard, redundant steering-wheel controls, and voice commands. The standard list of infotainment features includes navigation, USB and Bluetooth connectivity, SiriusXM satellite radio, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and a wireless smartphone charging pad. Onboard Wi-Fi and premium Burmester audio systems are optional.

As with many of its competitors, the S-class has a smaller trunk than you might imagine and doesn’t have a folding back seat to open up extra cargo room. We managed to fit five of our carry-on suitcases inside the trunk of both the sedan and the coupe. If you’ll need more cargo capacity, we’d suggest taking a look at the Lincoln Continental, the Volvo S90 or the Cadillac XTS, all of which held more carry-ons and can be had with a folding rear seat. It’s too bad Mercedes-Benz’s long-standing expertise in crash-test performance has yet to be validated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration or the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. In the absence of crash ratings from either agency, we cannot comment on its performance. That said, the S-class’s available suite of driver-assistance technologies is cutting edge and affordable—relatively speaking

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